France became the first European Union country to craft bespoke regulations for digital asset/token offerings that are not based on past security laws. However, from the time the ICO regulations were enforced in 2019, the AMF has only approved and white-listed two Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), with the WPO’s GreenToken ICO being the second.

France ICOs regulations

The French regulatory authority, the Autorite des Marches Financieres (AMF), started by conducting consultations on the risk, structure, volatility and applicability of coin offering in crowdfunding between mid-2017 and December 2017. This was after recognizing that digital coin offerings were becoming a global phenomenon and it did not want to be left behind as other countries around the world embarked on coming up with rules to regulate security tokens.

By fall 2018, a bill was tabled in parliament and it went on to be signed to law in early 2019, making France first EU country to have an ICO law in place.  The law which is referred to as the Pacte Law (or Loi Pacte), regulates defines digital tokens and lays out regulations for ICOs and intermediaries providing services related to crypto-assets.

Under the Pacte Law (or Loi Pacte), ICO issuers can legally raise funds by conducting an online ICO. Then after issuing the digital tokens, the tokens can be listed on a crypto exchange to be traded. The ICO issuers are given the liberty to choose to register for a VISA with the AMF to be ‘white-listed’ or to simply proceed with their ICO without the VISA but after submitting a document of disclosure to the AMF to enable token buyers to make an informed decision regarding the ICO.

However, the AMF emphasized that:

Although this approval is optional and ICOs without AMF approval will, therefore, continue to be legal, only those public offerings that have received the AMF approval may be marketed directly to the public in France.

It is also important to note that the new rules only apply for utility tokens. Digital securities are regulated under the old/existing securities regulations

The role of the AMF in the ICO regulations

Under the Pacte Law, the AMF:

  • Examines the disclosure document plus any advertising or promotional material that is circulated or published by the ICO issuer. The issuer should ensure that the disclosure document contains accurate, clear, non-misleading and detailed (outlining the risks that investors would face by purchasing the tokens) information.
  • Verifies that the ICO issuer has adopted enough procedures to protect and track the funds raised in the ICO.
  • Ensures that the issuer conducts themselves per the submitted disclosure document while complying with the regulations. If the issuer violates any of these, the AMF can compel the issuer to stop selling or offering the tokens, stop any advertising campaign and also remove its approval.
  • Verifies that the issuer is a legal entity registered under the French law in France. The AMF can only issue Visas to French-based issuers. Foreign corporations and entities seeking ICO market in the French market are free to do so but without the approval of the AMF.

Once the AMF approves an issuer to conduct an ICO, the issuer gets a VISA and is added to the whitelist of the approved ICOs.

However, it is important to note that the AMF approval is not advisability of the project behind the ICO. The AMF does not verify the technical and financial elements of the project. It also does not verify the computer programs behind the blockchain project. Therefore, it is up to the investor to research these before investing in the ICO.

The first ICO approved by the AMF

The AMF approved the first ICO in December 2019. The ICO was a company called French-ICO that has a platform for funding projects through cryptocurrencies. The ICO was scheduled to start in March 2020.

The AMF Visa that the French-ICO was issued with expires on June 1, 2020.

The ICO targets a minimum of €100,000 and a maximum of €1 million. Once the offering is finished the tokens will be tradable on Zebitex, which is a partner exchange to the French-ICO.

The second ICO approved by the AMF

On May 12, 2020, AMF approved the second ICO, which was for a firm called WPO.

WPO is a renewable energy company that services over 600 solar parks and wind firms across Europe and outside Europe.

In the ICO, WPO is offering its GreenToken (GTK) with a minimum target of €1.5 million and a maximum target of €10 million. According to the firm, one token will be going for €95 and the minimum amount that an investor can invest is €100.

The ICO is scheduled to start on September 8, 2020.

In the future, the GreenToken could be used to acquire goods and services from the GreenToken Network, which taps into the renewable energy industries serviced by WPO.

The tokens are expected to start trading on the SAVITAR exchange, which is a French crypto exchange.

In 2018, Telegram announced its intention to build Telegram Open Network (TON) blockchain and opted to use Initial Coin Offering (ICO) in raising capital for the project. Following this revelation, the social network company joined several other technology companies like Facebook, WhatsApp and Signal in aspirations of building blockchain networks and even issuing cryptocurrencies.

However, most of these blockchain projects have not gone down well especially with the Security Exchange Commission (SEC) in the US. Facebook, for example, has faced rigorous case battles aimed at its Libra cryptocurrency making hard for the company to go ahead with the project.

Telegram, on the other hand, decided to throw in the towel at the beginning of May 2020 after a long court battle with the Security Exchange Commission in the USA. Let us look at the sequence of events that led Telegram to abandon its blockchain project.

Telegram Open Network (TON)

TON, the designated blockchain network that Telegram is set to launch, is intended to offer decentralized cryptocurrency, called Gram, to the users of Telegram who have smartphones.

The cryptocurrency was largely viewed as a rival to the much-publicized Libra of Facebook. However, both cryptocurrencies (Libra and Gram) have faced significant scrutiny by the SEC, which has greatly hampered their development and issuance.

Telegram Pre-ICO in 2018

The messaging app established by the Russian tech expert, Pavel Durov, conducted a Pre-ICO early 2018 raising $1.7 billion from about 171 investors. However, the firm got into trouble after it emerged that about 39 of those investors were from the USA and the SEC had its reservations since the company had not registered the pre-sale.

After, the Pre-ICO, investors were very eager to cash in in the much-hyped ICO. However, the SEC stepped in and ordered Telegram to halt the post-ICO sale due to issues it raised with how its pre-ICO was conducted.

The legal battle

SEC launched a vicious legal battle against Gram ICO in October 2019, after ordering Telegram not to go ahead with its much anticipated Post-ICO.

The SEC accused Telegram of conducting an unregistered token sale to USA citizens. As a result, SEC pressured Telegram to disclose financial documents and answer a couple of questions to shed more light on the disposition of the investors’ funds it raised through the 2018 pre-ICO as required by its regulations.

In March 2020, a US judge dealt a blow to Telegram’s TON project by ruling that it cannot launch the blockchain network nor issue the Gram tokens before the case is settled. This led to a postponement of its April 30, 2020 deadline to launch TON.

However, it was also an early win for Telegram since the same judge barred the SEC from fully accessing Telegram ICO’s financial and banking details. Initially, Telegram’s lawyers had urged the court to throw out the case.

After, the court ruling in March, Telegram wrote to the court promising to issue the required information on the token distribution to investors and the funds collected from the investors to the SEC. Telegram was also to provide the SEC with all the communications, written agreements and amendments of the token sale agreements (including cancelling of the contracts).

All along the court battles were badly hurting the TON project after several postponements until the deadline for the activation of the refund clause in the Telegram’s purchase agreements was reached.

The refund for Gram investors

With the nearing April 30, TON launch deadline, and without any hope in sight for the launching of the blockchain network, investors had the rights to claim for refund as stipulated in Telegram’s purchase agreements refund clause.

According to the refund clause, investors could ask for a 72% refund.

The firm specifically urged the US investors who had invested with it to immediately agree the 72% refund so that they could pull out, claiming that there is an uncertain regulatory environment in the US.

To the investors from other parts of the world, Telegram offered a refund of 110% if they wait till April 30th, 2021.

“As a token of gratitude for your trust in TON, we are also offering you an alternative option to receive 110% of your original investment by April 30, 2021, which is 53% higher than the Termination Amount”

Telegram also announced that the company would allow investors who wait till 2021 to receive Gram or another cryptocurrency on the same term as to what was in the original Gram agreement.

“Purchasers who opted for the loan will have the further option to receive Grams or potentially another cryptocurrency on the same terms as those in their original Purchase Agreements.”

Throwing in the towel

Sadly, after all the drama with the SEC, and trying to retain investors with lucrative 110% returns if they held on till 2021, Telegram finally decided to abandon its TON project.

Early May 2020, Pavel Durov, the founder and CEO of Telegram, announced that telegram had stopped any further involvement with TON.

“Telegram’s active involvement with TON is over………You may see – or may have already seen – sites using my name or the Telegram brand or the ‘TON’ abbreviation to promote their projects. Don’t trust them with your money or data,” Pavel Durov wrote on his channel.

Being the 22nd richest country in the world and with the 7th largest economy in Asia, international investors including blockchain companies have lots of interest in Taiwan. With security tokens proving to be a go-to option for most blockchain companies, Taiwan’s Financial Supervisory Commission in July 2019 recognized the need to officially incorporate security token offering (STO) into the Securities and Exchange Act, which entails the regulatory framework for trading securities, by defining security tokens as securities.

According to the FSC, a security token is a cryptocurrency that is transferable and hold the following features:

  • The owners make capital contributions to the issuer
  • The owners invest in a common enterprise/project
  • The owners expect to receive profit depending on the efforts of the issuer or a third party.

The new Security Token Offering regulations

In January 2020, the FSC proposed deregulating STOs with an equivalent of up to NT$30 million. These STOs are characterized as “Exempt STO” in Paragraph 1 of Article 22 of the SEA. According to the article, these STOs are exempted from the obligation of reporting to the FSC.

Although the deregulation of STOs seemed to be a step in the right direction, the exemption comes with a tight set of restrictions. Additionally, the NT$30 million limit is relatively low, meaning that most of the STOs will not be exempted since most of them have targets above NT$30million.

However, the main objective behind the new regulations is to ensure that STOs in Taiwan are issued by regulated issuers and issued to professional Taiwan investors.

Issuer’s Qualifications

For a company or startup to issue security tokens in Taiwan, it has to be a company listed by shares, meaning it is incorporated per Taiwan’s Company Law.

For an STO to qualify for the exemption, the STOs must be conducted to on the same trading platform with the cumulative placements not exceeding the NT$30 million. The issuer must also ensure that the raised funds are denominated in the New Taiwan Dollar (NT$).

Additionally, the issuer should show the relevant issuance documents in an application to a security firm like the prospectus and security token application.

The prospectus, in particular, should include:

  • The Company Profile and Risks.
  • The Operation Overview.
  • The Operating Plan and Execution.
  • The Financial Overview.
  • An Expert’s Opinion on the Information Technology used in the issuance of the security token
  • Financial (non-certifying CPAs or securities underwriter) Expert’s Opinion about how reasonable the issuance price is.
  • Attorney’s opinion on whether the issuance of the security token complies with the set regulations and if the fundraising project adheres to the set legal rules.
  • Any other documents that should be disclosed and supplemented as per the securities firm notification.

The security firm that the issuers choose to use should have a securities dealer license.

Investors’ regulations

STO investors should be professional investors that qualify as per the criteria under paragraph 3 of Article 3 of the Offshore Structured Products regulations.

For the Exempt STO, the amount that a professional investor can subscribe should not exceed the limit of NT$300000.

Key Takeaways

For an STO to qualify for the “Exempt STO” it should target raising NT$30 million, which is equivalent to $1003764 USD. This is relatively low and means that most of the security token offerings will most likely not fall under the Exempt STO category. The Exempt STO category is however good for the small startups looking to raise a small capital.

Secondly, only professional investors as per the Offshore Structured Products regulations can participate in an STO. Also, the maximum amount that an investor can cash in cannot exceed NT$300,000 on a single STO.

Thirdly, STO funding is limited to the New Taiwan Dollar (NT$). This makes it increasingly difficult for foreign investors. Also, issuers cannot raise funds in other cryptocurrencies or USD as is the norm with most STOs.

Fourthly, an STO can only raise funds through one platform. Therefore, one STO cannot use different platforms to issue security tokens. Also, there is a limit to the number of STOs that can be accepted by each trading platform. This reduces market participation of STO issuers and operators of the trading platform.

Fifthly and lastly, there are many business restrictions and strict qualifications for security token trading platform operators.

After conducting a successful IEO of its stablecoin, JST, on Poloniex on 5th May, the TRON-based stablecoin lending platform succeeded in getting the JST coin listed on MXC Exchange only two days after. The JUST (JST) IEO sold out in just 4 minutes 26 seconds according to TRON’s CEO, Justin Sun.

JST token sale price was $0.00202 during the IEO. Upon its listing on MXC Exchange, its price spiked to $0.04, which was 18.8 times its token sale price, breaking the record of IEOs Return of Investment (RoI) in such a short time. This also thrust the JUST project into the league of the best performing IEO funded projects.

Let’s take a look at what this MXC Exchange means to investors. If an investor had purchased 1000 tokens, it probably cost him/her $2.02. If the investor decided to register on the MXC Exchange and trade the stable coin, he/she would sell it at $40 making a profit of $37.98 in just two days.

Although JST price then lowered from $0.04 in the following minutes, the stablecoin is currently trading at $0.0088, which is 3.36 times the price at which the coin was sold at.

Ideally, if an investor decided to trade in the purchased JST tokens, he would make substantial profits.

The TRON-based stablecoin lending platform, JUST

JUST is a decentralized lending platform that is built on the TRON blockchain. Users in JUST can stake TRX, the TRON cryptocurrency, to generate the JST stablecoin that can be used to pay for a number of things.

The platform uses a decentralized finance (DeFi) lending and governance protocol.

Poloniex’s Tron-powered IEO launching platform

Interestingly, the CEO of TRON, Justin Sun also holds a substantial share at Poloniex Exchange. Sun was among a number of Asian investors who bought Poloniex towards the end of 2019.

By volume, Poloniex is considered the 15th largest cryptocurrency platform. It launched its IEO launching platform, the Poloniex’s LaunchBase, which carries a lot of resemblance to Binance Launchpad.

Projects looking forward to conducting IEOs on Poloniex’s LaunchBase will issue tokens in exchange of TRON’s TRX token. In exchange, the project behind the IEOs will receive professional advice and guidance.

By launching its IEO launching platform, Poloniex joins the growing list of crypto exchanges providing blockchain startups with a lifeline by providing a platform for them to conduct IEOs.

JST was the first IEO to be conducted on Poloniex’s LaunchBase, barely a month after the platform was launched, proving that the platform is up to the task.

Singapore is recognized as a pacesetter in blockchain and cryptocurrency due to its unfailingly supportive regulatory environment. Over the last few years, Singapore has seen a tremendous rise in the number of blockchain projects that have been registered within its borders.

To keep up with the evolving world of digital tokens, the Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore (IRAS) published a guide on the e-Tax that details how digital token transactions including ICOs, IEOS and STOs shall be taxed. These came a few months after Singapore released its new regulations for enterprises offering payment services.

The guide focuses on the taxation of three types of digital tokens. These include security tokens, utility tokens and payment tokens (tokens used as payment options). The guide also elaborates on the taxation of other tokens that are distributed through unconventional means like hard forks and airdrops.

Payment tokens

According to the e-Tax guide, all transactions done using payment tokens shall be considered to be in the form of barter trade. Therefore, the recipients of the tokens shall be taxed depending on the value of the underlying goods or services.

Nonetheless, purchasing a payment token is not taxable. However, the returns from the disposal of the token are taxable if the process involved is a trading activity.

Payment tokens miners shall also be taxed if the mining intends to make profits.

Payment tokens distributed via hard forks and airdrops are not taxable if they are freely given out.

Utility tokens

According to the e-Tax guide, utility token transactions are not taxable since they are mainly acquired to enable the users to acquire future services within a specific blockchain network.

Security tokens

According to the e-Tax guide, security tokens are regarded as a form of equity or debt since they give owners an implied degree of control or equity to a certain asset or project. As such, the taxation of the returns gotten from security tokens depends on the type of the return. The types in consideration here are interests and dividends.

ICOs and STOs taxation

According to the IRAS, the proceeds of Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs) and Security Token Offerings (STOs) shall be taxed depending on the functions and rights of the used token.

If the issued token is a utility token, the sale shall be considered to be in the form of revenue and is therefore taxable. This is because the utility token is an obligation for the issuer to provide a service or good in the future that shall be bought or paid for using this token.

On the other hand, the issuance of security tokens shall not be taxed since the proceeds parallel the proceeds obtained from issuance of equities or debts, which is normally capital in nature. However, as mentioned above, withholding tax obligation and the general income tax shall apply to the interest and dividends paid to the owners of the token.

Tokens set aside for founders in ICOs and STOs

In most cases, startups set aside some tokens for the founders. In this case, if the tokens are used to pay or compensate the founders, they are regarded as revenue and the founder that receives them shall be taxed. However, if the tokens are not issued as a form of payment, they are regarded as a capital asset of the founder.

What a taxpayer dealing with digital tokens in Singapore should do

IRAS instructs taxpayers in Singapore that deal with digital tokens to keep proper records of the digital token transactions so that it can be simple to file the returns.

The records should have the following:

  • Transaction date.
  • The number of tokens sold or received.
  • Value of the digital token at the time of transaction.
  • The used exchange rate.
  • Purpose of the transaction.
  • Details of the customers/suppliers in case it was a buy or sell transaction.
  • Details of the ICO or STO.
  • Invoices or Receipts of the expenses incurred within the business.

According to WeeTracker media firm, African startups raised about $1.3 billion from venture capital funding in 2019, which is an improvement from the past years. Nevertheless, startups in Africa still face enormous challenges when it comes to funding projects due to a lack of liquidity.

Blockchain technology could step into the gap and help startups especially in the emerging tech hubs like Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa to raise funds for their projects through blockchain-powered equity crowdfunding. Equity crowdfunding has helped revolutionize the way businesses raise funds from investors.

By adopting blockchain technology, startups do not have to go through the tedious process of getting their companies listed on the stock markets to sell their shares.

Why investors hesitate

In Africa, the ecosystem for doing business is still not that favourable for startups to achieve reasonable growth in a short time span. Most startups struggle to make ends meet due to factors like high taxes, which are common in many African countries. In some worst-case scenarios, some startups end up closing shops. This makes investors shy off from investing since they are not sure if they will live to get the returns.

Also, in Africa, secondary markets are scarce resulting in low market liquidity for investors to exit from investments. Venture capitals, for example, look for entrepreneurs that build sustainable businesses with promising exit opportunities. For a startup to win a venture capital investment, it has to have at least an IPO, merger, or some acquisitions, which are only possible if a startup achieves a certain level of growth.

To create the necessary liquidity, startups in Africa could adopt blockchain technology to enable them to tokenize their assets.

 How token-based financing increases market liquidity

By using blockchain, startups can create tokens (either utility or security tokens). They can then go ahead and sell the tokens through Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), Initial Exchange Offerings (IEOs), or Security Token Offering (STOs) for the case of security tokens.

Investors will find it safer to invest in startups by buying tokens since the tokens are easily traded in exchanges where the liquidity is high. If an investor purchases some tokens from a startup, and the startup succeeds to get the tokens listed on a cryptocurrency exchange, then the investor can trade the tokens and make some profits. In most cases, the price at which the tokens are listed on the crypto exchanges is usually higher than the price of the tokens during the initial offerings.

Therefore, an investor could decide to exit the market immediately the tokens of the startup get listed on an exchange.

Besides, since a good amount of investment in Africa comes from outside Africa, token financing offers the best opportunity to tap into the external sources. Blockchains are usually decentralized and they allow cheap and fast cross broader transfer of funds. Therefore, investors from any corner of the world can easily purchase the tokens of a startup in Africa without necessarily having to travel to a specific country or sign huge volumes of paper agreements.

Examples of African startups that have reaped big from token financing

Below are some startups that have raised funds through token financing by conducting ICOs, IEOs, and STOs.

  1. Golix

Golix, a Zimbabwean crypto exchange that was started in 2014. In 2018 Golix conducted an ICO that raised $23 million by offering their GLX token.

  1. BlockBank

The UK’s BlockBank that acquired some stake in Kenyan Spire Bank. BlockBank was able to raise about 12.8 million in its pre-ICO conducted in 2018.

  1. Wala

Wala, the “zero-fee money app” South African startup that was able to raise $1.2 million through an ICO conducted in 2019.

  1. Mazzuma

Mazzuma, a Ghanaian startup that was raised over $45,000 in its third token sale phase after successfully conducting a pre-phase, first phase, and a second phase.

Blockchain technology is revolutionizing every aspect of our lives. Besides the impact of blockchain technology on Governments, financial institutions, and conglomerates, blockchain technology has also proved to be a game changer when it comes to the way small Fintech startups raise capital. Startups can now conduct Initial coin Offerings (ICOs) among other methods to raise funds for their projects.

However, for an ICO to be successful, the development team has to diligently choose the blockchain protocol upon which their project’s token will be built on. This is mainly because the functionality of the token will greatly be influenced by the chosen blockchain protocol.

Besides, there are other blockchain technology use cases that the startups can benefit from the blockchain protocol they choose to use. Some of the most profound use cases include asset management through asset digitization, decentralized finance, global trade & commerce, and payments.

Advantages of using blockchain technology

  1. Ability to streamline and automate executions. The use of smart contracts, for example, has made it possible for businesses to eliminate intermediaries and thus streamlining business processes and allowing real-time clearing and settlements.
  2. Increased security during transactions. The fact that the data stored on blockchain networks is immutable transactions tamper-proof and thus authentic.
  3. Ability to develop and deploy permissioned blockchain networks that have a shared business logic and customizable governance.
  4. Ability to digitize assets. This is what has made it possible for startups to conduct online crowd funding through methods such as ICOs.

Most used blockchain protocols for creating ICO tokens

1.    Ethereum

Ethereum is an open-source, public Blockchain distributed computing platform that features smart contract functionality. It was the first such blockchain platform to be developed and it has paved the way for the development of many other blockchain networks that are based on its blockchain architecture.

Ethereum was the first blockchain protocol to prove that blockchain was not only meant for the creation of cryptocurrencies for payments as its predecessor, Bitcoin.

Ethereum provides a platform for blockchain developers to develop decentralized applications. The decentralized applications developed on Ethereum are usually accessible from anywhere in the world. Also its ERC-20 token standard has earned itself a reputation when it comes to the development of cryptocurrency tokens. Actually, most of the altcoins use Ethereum’s ERC-20 token standard.

The token used for conducting transactions within the Ethereum network is called Ether (ETH) and it is normally generated by the platform as a reward for mining nodes the performed computations.

Some of the notable features of Ethereum apart from the smart contracts include the Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM) that executes scripts through a network of public nodes throughout the world and Gas, which is its internal transaction pricing mechanism.

Ethereum use cases largely revolve around smart contracts and dApps.

Pros of Ethereum enterprise use cases
  • Ethereum supports the development of decentralized applications (dApps). Therefore business enterprises can use the platform to write customized blockchain codes that whose performance is oriented towards the specific business enterprise.
  • Ethereum has a very promising use case in decentralized finance (DeFi). Enterprises can use Ethereum’s smart contracts to issue or go for smart contract powered loans. Developers can also use the smart contracts to mint stable coins as in the case with the MakerDAO project. Smart contracts can also be used in creating decentralized exchanges.
  • Ethereum has proved to be of great use when it comes to tokenizing real-world assets. One of Ethereum’s use cases in line with this is the PolyMath, which has embarked on the creation of a revolutionizing platform for creating security tokens.
  • The decentralized nature of Ethereum and the decentralized applications developed on it make it impossible for hacking attacks.
  • Ethereum’s smart contracts have completely revolutionized the way transactions are made. Instead of writing paper agreements, the transaction agreements can now be recorded in a computer code. In so doing, it has eliminated the need for intermediaries, and parties can now transact directly.
Cons of Ethereum enterprise use cases
  • Though Ethereum’s smart contracts can be easily used in generating digital identities. It has proven to be extremely difficult for governments or regulatory authorities to check the authenticity of digital identities.
  • Ethereum was designed to work through the proof-of-work (PoW) consensus mechanism, which makes it less scalable compared to other blockchain networks. And although there are plans to switch the consensus mechanism from PoW to PoS, the process is not that easy.

2.      Stellar

Stellar is a decentralized open-source blockchain network that allows cross border transactions by converting the currencies to digital representations. The network uses a cryptocurrency token known as Stellar Lumen to facilitate transactions within the network.

Some of Stellar’s uses cases involve its integration into Vumi, an open-source messaging platform, enabling Vumi to use cellphone talk time as airtime. Stellar also was integrated into Oradian’s banking platform to enable the bank top to add microfinance institutions in Nigeria.

Stellar has also partnered with several banks including Deloitte, IBM, KlickEX to facilitate cross border transactions.

Pros of Stellar enterprise use cases
  • The stellar network makes cross border transactions cheaper since it eliminates the need for intermediaries. It only costs an average of 1/100,000 of a penny per transaction.
  • Stellar also makes the cross border transactions to be faster compared to the use of traditional means. Stellar can easily achieve 10,000 transactions per second with an average on-chain settlement time of 5 Seconds.
  • Digital currencies developed using Stellar can be traded on StellarX, which is Stellar’s decentralized exchange platform.
  • Stellar has smart contract functionality and users can be developed and executed smart contracts.
  • With Stellar, there are no limits. Businesses can transact any amount at any time to whatever location.
  • Stellar has the necessary documentation, tooling, and support to help enterprises get their project quickly.
Cons of Stellar enterprise use cases
  • All Stellar accounts are required to have a certain minimum balance of lumens.
  • Stellar’s smart contract is not as developed as those of Ethereum blockchain.

3.      Binance Smart Chain (BSC)

Binance smart chain (BSC) is a blockchain-based platform launched by Binance that shall enable developers to issue new cryptocurrencies as well as ICO coins. The platform supports smart contracts and decentralized applications (dApps).

The Binance smart chain shall run parallel to the current Binance Chain blockchain.

Binance smart chain gives Binance Company its blockchain rather than depending on Ethereum.

Pros of Binance smart chain enterprise use cases
  • Enterprises can easily create customized blockchain networks for use in their businesses.
  • Just like Ethereum, Binance smart chain has smart contract functionality which can be of great help in business transactions.
  • Binance smart chain enables developers to come up with their cryptocurrency tokens that can also be used for Initial Coin Offerings.
  • Binance smart chains also make it easier for the cryptocurrency coins developed to be listed on Binance exchange.
Cons of Binance smart chain enterprise use cases
  • The binance smart chain features a delegated proof-of-stake (DPoS) system of governance, which is prone to centralization. Centralization would stifle creativity among dApp developers.

4.      Tron

Tron protocol is a blockchain network that provides a decentralized virtual machine that can execute a program through the network of public nodes within the network. TRON TRX is the cryptocurrency token used within the Tron network.

There are several use cases for Tron, key among them being the ability to use TRX as a payment system. Websites like travala.com have incorporated TRX as a mode of payment already.

Another use case for Tron was the partnership with BitTorrent, enabling it to use a token called BTT, which is a Tron based digital coin.

TRX has also found lots of use in the world of online gaming.

Pros of Tron enterprise use cases
  • Transactions within the Tron network are free.
  • The transaction speed is relatively high since the system can conduct 2000 transactions per second.
  • It allows dApps developers to easily develop applications (dApps) that are custom made according to the requirements of the enterprise and deploy them.
  • The TPS is much more improved in Tron thus giving Tron a high throughput.
  • Tron also has high scalability and it gives developers a wider variety of ways to deploy their applications.
Cons of Tron enterprise use cases
  • Tron’s whitepaper suggests quite a lengthy development timeline that suggests that we may not be seeing the real application of TRON come to life soon. That leaves Tron users with only one choice of buying TRX and trading it on exchanges or using it as a payment option.

5.      Cardano

Cardano is an open-source decentralized public blockchain network that features smart contract functionality. It was built to improve the financial system.

Some of the renown Cardano use cases include the GRNET, released in 2018 for checking student diplomas, the New York Ledger Accelerator (SOSV) and Traxia, released in 2018 for converting invoices into smart contracts so that they can be sold as short-term assets,

Pros of Cardano enterprise use cases
  • It allows the use of smart contracts and provides blockchain developers with a network to develop and deploy dApps.
  • Cardano has proved to be flexible, secure, and scalable for enterprises. This is mainly due to the use of the Proof-of-Stake consensus mechanism.
  • Cardano integrates a wide range of digital coins without the use of an intermediary.
  • It also combines regulation and privacy.
  • It is one of the few blockchain networks that go through a third party audit, thus making it highly transparent.
  • Cardano blockchain network is made up of two layers, the Cardano settlement and ledger processing transactions layer and the Cardano computation layer that supports smart contracts and provides users with a platform for building DApps. This makes it less prone to the disruptions brought about by soft and hard forks.
  • There is a middle layer made up of side chains that connects the two main layers. This makes Cardano more scalable.
Cons of Cardano enterprise use cases
  • Cardano introduces its programming language called Plutus and developers could have a hard time trying to learn the new programming language to be able to develop dApps on the platform.

Germany’s ‘reversible ICO’ breathes life into the ICOs

After going through trying times, ICOs are poised to regain their glory after German regulators approved incorporating investor protections to the ICOs in a project they are terming as reversible Initial coin offerings (rICOs). This will certainly be a game-changer in the Fintech crowdfunding landscape since ICOs hold the record of being the cheapest among the currently available funding mechanisms.

ICOs’ dwindling popularity among blockchain and fintech developers and investors was due to the lack of an elaborate regulatory framework for the ICOs across the world. And the new ‘reversible ICO’ seeks to bring order to the way ICOs are regulated especially by protecting investors.

According to the German regulators, the approved reversible ICO’ shall allow investors to buy tokens gradually and be in a position to remove their support and funding at any time if they feel like doing so.

Reversible ICO developers

The rICO was developed by Fabian Vogelsteller, who was actively involved in the development of the ERC-20 Ethereum standard.

Fabian first floated rCIO idea in 2018 at Devcon. It has since taken about one year to bring the idea into reality.

How the reversible ICO will function

The main objective of rICO is to add a layer of investor protection to the largely unregulated ICOs. In so doing, it will give investors an upper hand and also shield them from scammers.

Reversible ICOs shall be carried out in two phases rather than the way they were ICOs were formally issued in one go. In the first phase, investors will first reserve the tokens they desire to purchase. Then in the second phase, they can buy the reserved tokens gradually over time. By doing this, investors will have time to watch over the project issuing the ICO.

Additionally, if the investor sees any reason not to continue supporting the project by buying the reserved tokens, they can release the reserved tokens and also have their ETH refunded. That way scammers will have no chance of getting away with investors’ money.

The two phases make it possible for investors to understand the project as they invest to avoid losing the opportunity as they try to figure out if a project is legit or not.

The reversible ICO holds close resemblance to Vitalik Buterin’s proposal to have ICOs that resemble the DAO. According to Buterin, the DAO like ICOs would permit DAO participants to vote on milestones while still funding the project behind the ICO.

It is needless to point out the other numerous proposals on ICOs that were floated in trying to combat the issue of ICO regulation.

The rICO has some advantages over Buterin’s proposal in that rICO is simple and it is fast compared to the DAO like ICOs that would experience stumpy voting participation by the DAOs.

The future of ‘reversible ICOs’

Germany is one of the largest economies in Europe and its regulatory authority Bafin has made great strides in the field of tokenized assets compared to countries like the USA.

Germany was actually among the first countries to approve the use of Security Token Offerings back in 2019.

Although it is not yet clear if investors in the other parts of Europe or the world would be eager to approve the rICO fundraising mechanism, rICOs represent a great step towards regulating ICOs.

The first use case for reversible ICO (rICO)

The first blockchain project that shall use rICO to raise funds shall be LUKSO, which is a sister to Ethereum when it comes to making mainstream decentralized applications

The LUKSO rICO is scheduled for some time next month if all things go as planned.

Every business has a business model, which is the overall architecture of how the business orchestrates its day to day operations to create, deliver and capture value. For a business to become a success, the business model they are using must address certain elements, which include:

  • Value proposition – refers to the services and products that the company/business produces.
  • Value capture – describes how the business makes money by showing cost and revenue structures
  • Value creation – describes how processes and activities are carried out, and how resources are used in the business
  • Value delivery – refers to the process of identifying the target customers

Business models, however, differ depending on the industry, which can either be traditional based or internet-based. Traditional based businesses are primarily concerned with producing tangible products and improving their supply chains. On the other hand, internet-based businesses focus on operating digital services/products and do all they can to find value for the digital services/products

However, both traditional based and internet-based models thrive well when business transactions are fast and secure and fully transparent. And the only technology that can offer these features is the blockchain technology.

Blockchain technology

Blockchain is a decentralized digital ledger that supports fast, secure and fully transparent transactions. Though it has mainly been recognized through cryptocurrencies, which are the digital currencies used in transacting within the blockchain networks, it also has other real-life applications.

Blockchain technology applications span from Agriculture, healthcare, cloud storage, logistics, real estate, education, public transport, and food and beverages among many others. Different blockchain startups have come up with different blockchain-based solutions and business models for almost every sector around the globe.

As a result, blockchain technology has become appealing to economies around the world since it offers immutability, security and also eliminates the need for third-party intermediaries/middlemen. This is prompting governments across the globe to work against the clock to ensure that there are proper regulations set in place to govern the blockchain industry to allow it to flourish in this digital age.

Basic blockchain working principle

Blockchain networks are purely decentralized. Therefore, they work on a Person-to-person (P2P) governance model. As such, the effect of external pressures is greatly reduced.

Furthermore, blockchain networks use Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) to facilitate and record transactions and thus ensuring that the transactions are secure.

Lastly, blockchain networks require the creation of a token for use as a mode of payment during transactions within the network. These tokens are then assigned real-life value by linking them to fiat currencies.

For instance, a company could create a blockchain network called ‘Busses’ and create a token called ‘BUSS’ that will be used for transactions within the blockchain system. One ‘BUSS’ token could be equal to $0.5 at the start (when it is first introduced to users). As the adoption of this token rises and the ‘Busses blockchain’ network continues becoming popular, the value of ‘BUSS’ could increase.

Blockchain governance framework

Blockchain technology is rapidly revamping the traditional regulation models to make them more cost-effective, relevant and accessible to businesses. Most importantly blockchain has fostered the creation of consensus algorithms which makes decision making in DTL more efficient.

Blockchain governance promotes the use of a decentralized governance framework across different business sectors. As a result, this makes it easy for businesses to access the Interconnected Trusted Network of Loyal Customers.

Nevertheless, the decentralized blockchain applications must look for ways in which they can complement the roles that the central authorities were playing in governing the different industry sectors.

Application of blockchain technology in businesses

Blockchain technology has greatly transformed the way businesses carry on with their day to day activities. There are four predominant domains/fields where blockchain has found lots of applications.

Financial sector

The first is the financial services sector, especially touching on bank transfers, accounting, and auditing. Traditionally, these sectors involved the use of so many intermediaries. However, several blockchain solutions that eliminate the need for intermediaries and thus reduced transaction costs have been invented.  Furthermore, there are blockchain solutions that allow for cross-border transactions without having to account for currency exchange fees as would be the norm with using the traditional models that depend on the fiat currencies.

Supply chain sector

Second is the supply chain sector. This has thrived to become the most successful non-financial blockchain application across the globe. The architecture of blockchain networks allows users/members to identify and track the possession of a certain item throughout the supply chain. Since the data fed into the blockchain network is immutable, cases of fraud are eliminated. It also reduces redundancy where every stakeholder would be required to update their database. The integration of IoT and blockchain has also allowed industries to be able to track various aspects of products on transit to ensure that the standards are not compromised. For example, a company dealing with the distribution of meat can install thermometers into the refrigerators being used to ferry the meat and integrate the feedback from those thermometers into a blockchain network for real-time tracking of the temperatures to ensure that the meat remains well refrigerated.

Market sector

Companies or businesses depend on trusted third parties such as Google, Amazon, Uber, Alibaba, among others to provide the platforms where transactions can be done. Blockchain networks eliminate the need of these third parties by introducing nodes throughout their systems that make it possible for individual members to transact directly without the need for an intermediary.

Social welfare

Through the use of smart contracts, blockchain users/members can manage the outcomes and also automate the process of concluding contracts. If a blockchain user enters into a smart contract, the funds can be held in an escrow account and released once the contract is marked as complete. This ensures that the customer feels safe and it also eliminates scams.

If the contract is not carried out according to the laid out specifications, the customer has all the rights of terminating the contract and he/she is guaranteed of getting his/her money back.

Impact of blockchain technology on business models

Business models have a lot to benefit from the blockchain technology. The most significant advantages of employing blockchain-based business models include:

  1. Reduced costs, which is attained by eliminating intermediaries.
  2. Increased transaction rates.
  3. Reduced redundancy and need for record-keeping since blockchain automatically stores immutable data.
  4. Enhanced traceability and verification of information.
  5. Blockchain also offers alternative approaches to how assets are authenticated.
  6. The transactions performed through a blockchain network are secure since they are protected by a layer of cryptographic encryption.
  7. Blockchain supports distributed autonomous organizations (DAOs), which makes it possible to eliminate the need for intermediaries since DAOs don’t rely on not central governments and they are operated by members through the use of smart contracts.
  8. Blockchain-based models make it possible to use cryptography and asset tokenization, which is the current trend. This further makes it easy to conduct fundraising. Contrary to using the traditional shares markets to raise capital, a business can easily raise funds through methods such as Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), Initial Exchange Offerings (IEOs) and Security Token Offerings (STOs).

Singapore has positioned itself as a financial hub not only in South East Asia but also in the whole world. Besides, it has also become a global crypto hub.

Most blockchain companies prefer registering their projects in Singapore due to the favorable cryptocurrency ecosystem there. As a result, Singapore has become home to some of the most innovative projects; the likes of CitiOS, and GeTS, among many other blockchain projects being implemented in almost every sector in Singapore.

The main reason why blockchain technology has thrived so much in Singapore is because the country has been able to maintain a reliably supportive regulatory environment for emerging technologies such as blockchain. The World Bank has ranked Singapore in the top three countries with Ease of Doing Business Index for over a decade. The government gives grants to companies to encourage them to adopt new emerging businesses and it also launched the Smart Nation Initiative in 2014 that aims at creating solutions that will transform the country using big data, networks and Infocomm technologies.

The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) also created a regulatory sandbox for financial Institutions to experiment with Fintech solutions. The sandbox relaxes some regulations for the industry.

Also, as some countries like China and South Korea limit the use of blockchain-based fundraising methods like Initial Coins (ICOs), Initial Exchange Offerings (IEOs) and Security Token Offerings STOs), Singapore has literary encouraged the industry to grow. This has made it possible for startups to easily fund their blockchain projects, which in turn offer solutions to some of the needs that Singapore and the world at whole may have.

IEOs in Singapore

In 2019, Singapore played host to over 28 IEOs out of the about 100 IEOs that were conducted globally. This positioned Singapore as a global leader in IEOs. The second country, the United States of America, only played host to about 11 IEOs. China hosted 9 IEOs, the United Kingdom hosted 7, South Korea Hosted 4, the Cayman Islands hosted 3, Estonia hosted 3, Estonia hosted 3, Switzerland hosted 3, Germany hosted 2 and Malta hosted 2.

The 28 IEOs that were conducted within Singapore’s boundaries raised over $188 million, which is quite a large amount for a single country. This success is greatly attributed to the fact that several cryptocurrency exchanges like Binance are finding their way into Singapore. Besides, Singapore has its cryptocurrency exchange the Huobi Global that has an IEO Launchpad by the name Huobi Prime.

And out of the total amount that was raised through IEOs, over 50% of that amount was raised through the top five cryptocurrency exchanges that include Huobi and Binance among the likes of Gate.io, Okex, and Bittrex.

2020 Projection

The IEO industry in 2020 kicked off with a boom with Biki.com crypto exchange, a Singapore-based exchange joined the league of IEO issuers by announcing its first IEO in February.

With the emergence of new IEO exchange launchpads based in Singapore, and the rush by some of the most renowned exchanges to gain access to the Singaporean market, we could see an even higher number of IEOs being raised in Singapore in 2020 compared to 2019.